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Thursday, June 01, 2006

Where kids are worth more dead than alive

In a twisted but not surprising story in today's Jerusalem Post:

A group of Palestinian children were sent towards the Gaza Strip border fence holding toy guns on Thursday in order to test the vigilance of the soldiers on duty.

From a distance, troops noticed four apparently armed Palestinians approaching the border north of the Kissufim crossing.

When the four were some 400 meters from the fence, the soldiers realized that they were children, who looked to be about 13 years of age, and that their guns were toys.

This is not the first time that Palestinian Arabs cynically played with their children's lives.

But in the sick world of the Palestinian Arab psyche, it makes sense. As has been pointed out many times, the actions of these Arabs are completely inconsistent with building a state and completely consistent with destroying Israel.

Dead kids that can be blamed on Israel get media attention, putting pressure on Israelis to be more careful as they try to come up with better ways to defend their own lives as well as the lives of Palestinian children. The mileage that Palestinian Arabs can get out of a dead kid (or pretend dead kid) can be enormous. Combine that with the culture of death that permeates the territories and you have a paradoxical situation:

Palestinian Arabs have a vested interest in having their kids be killed by Israel, and Israel has a vested interest in keeping Palestinian Arab kids as safe as possible.

So Israel spends more time and money and effort in protecting Palestinian Arab children than the Arabs do.

This reason alone demolishes the "argument" that far-left and pro-terror websites use that Israel is practicing genocide against Palestinian Arabs. Forgetting that Israel actually has some morals, unlike its enemies, even if Israel wanted every Arab kid dead she wouldn't do anything about it because it only ends up hurting Israel.

And yet, even when the two sides of a conflict have such diametrically different views of morality, the world insists on being "even-handed" in dealing with the conflict.